Anywhere Ballot Poster (Accessible Voting Technology Conference)

Anywhere Ballot: Why is this the ballot solution for accessiblity?

The University of Baltimore project team presented this poster at the Accessible Voting Technology Research Conference, sponsored by the Election Assistance Commission (EAC) and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), April 1-2, 2013.

Download the poster as a PDF file

Full text of the poster follows

Poster for the Anywhere Ballot: Why is this the ballot solution for accessibility?

Text of the Poster

Anywhere Ballot: Why is this the ballot solution for accessibility?

Responsive: single design is flexible to size

  • Good for different kinds of devices and screens
  • Good for accessibility and AT standards

Streamlined for voting: no complexity, no distractions

  • Minimal information density, words, and choices on each screen
  • Contextual information icons only for the most vital information
  • Straightforward interactions and clear visual feedback of actions

Simple language: readable and usable

  • Tested with people with low literacy
  • Avoids election jargon and ambiguous words

Electronic marking: more accessible

  • Error management for under/over votes
  • Typed write-in improves clarity
  • Demonstrates clear impact of straight party vote

Built through iterative testing

  • Evolved over 33 people and 7 days of testing
  • Tested solutions quickly to see what worked

Illustrations show a selection of the ballot pages:

  • Introductory instructions on how to vote
  • “Vote for 1” with a candidate selected
  • Contextual information on U.S. Senator
  • Write-in screen
  • Multiple selection contest screen
  • Pop-up alert to prevent over-voting
  • Vote review screen
  • Final confirmation screen

A ballot interface design brought to you by Oxide Design Co., CivicDesigning.org, and the University of Baltimore with funding from ITIF through the U.S. Election Assistance Commission’s Accessible Voting Technology Initiative.